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Jacques LeFèvre

Many scholars consider Jacques LeFèvre (Jacob Faber) a pre-reformer. In fact, he was not, as will become plain.   Who was he? LeFèvre was a Frenchman, born in Etaples, in the province of Picardy, about 1455. So he was in fact born before the Reformation began. Significant is that he was a humanist. Humanists were […]

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Making Mud Pies in a Slum

Have you ever considered what the church world would look like today if Martin Luther had not been around to start the Protestant Reformation? What if this was the front page article of the Wittenberg Times in July 1505? Promising Student Found Dead “On Wednesday, July 2 a group of travelers making their way through […]

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True Courage

This October, we’ll celebrate the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther pounding the 95 Theses onto the door of the church in Wittenberg, starting what we now call the Reformation. We’ll hear a lot about heroes of faith and courage, and we might wonder how those heroes had such courageous faith. The Bible uses the phrase […]

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Discussion on the Canons

This discussion is reprinted from the first issue of Beacon Lights, January, 1941. It asks and answers some very important questions about creeds and confessions that we must know. This discussion is continued in the four installments of Beacon Lights following January 1941. You can see them at beaconlights.org. A couple of typing mistakes found in the original […]

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The Reformation and Twentieth Century Protestantism

Excerpt from the pamphlet “The Reformation and Twentieth Century Protestantism.” October 31 is the anniversary of the Reformation of the church—“Reformation Day.” On the 31st of October in the year 1517, in Wittenberg, Germany, the monk and university professor Martin Luther nailed to the door of the great Church a list of 95 propositions, or […]

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The Ploughboy (2)

Water lapped the sides of the ship as it docked in England’s busiest port. Fog had settled in nicely with the darkness to provide a murky blanket of cover. And cover was what they needed. “Roll main sail! Drop anchor!” Sailors bustled over deck and pier to bring the great hull of the ship safely […]

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October 31, 1517

The winds of autumn were upon them, hurling straggling leaves as well as the scarves and cloaks of those upon the path. But the wind did not daunt them. No, it was a special day. They held their coats and hats tightly around themselves and pressed onward, the wind following them all the way to […]

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A Child of the Reformation

I am a child of the I6lh century Reformation. I make known that fact with the least hesitation. My spiritual fathers had an inheritance so grand Now given to me wherein by grace alone I stand.   Blessed is that heritage, a great wealth untold, Incomparable even to all of the creation’s gold. The Scriptures […]

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The Reformation

After darkness, light The fearful hold of priest-craft gone As the gospel shines among us throng. After blindness, sight   After chains, release. The church’s war with God is o’er And Satan masters us no more. After conflict, peace.   After merit, grace. No longer to the Pope we bow For Christ the King is […]

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Remembering the Reformation

The only Reformed Cathedral in the world is found in the Swiss city of Geneva. The picture shows you a recent photograph of the main entrance, made of natural stone in the eleventh century in the highest part of the city. In 1534 the building was given to the Reformed Congregation and all the statues […]

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Five English Reformers

Five English Reformers by Ryle, J.C. ,The Banner of Truth Trust, 1981             Five English Reformers was written in 1890 by J. C. Ryle, a member of the Church of England. Ryle felt compelled to respond to a movement in the Church of England at that time to bring the Church of England back to […]

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Reformation…1977

This month, we remember the Reform­ation. On October 31, 1517, Martin Luther nailed his ninety-five thesis on the church door at Wittenberg. You all know much of the history of that event and those events which followed. We all know right away that the sale of indulgences was one of the issues; that a monk […]

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Our Reformation

Reformation. What does it mean to you? Is it merely some historical fact that you learned in school? Is it just a day that you celebrate every year by going to a lecture? How much do we really know about the Reformation? How much do we really care? After all that was almost 460 years […]

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John Huss: Reformation Forerunner?

Editors note – This is the second and last installment of the article on John Huss written by Rev. Dale Kuiper. It is important to notice here that Wycliffism died out in England shortly after Wycliffe’s death. The Lollards were soon stamped out by an inquisition-type suppression. His condemned writings no man dared print. However, […]

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Reformation Day

Each year at about this time Reformation Day is called to your attention, covenant youth. However, has it become so natural that you cease to consider its importance to you? This could become a rather easy thing to let happen, for by nature we are so inclined to take things for granted. Perhaps this has […]

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John Huss: Reformation Forerunner

The following article is the first of two installments taken from a paper written by the Reverend Dale H. Kuiper. It was originally written as a seminary paper, but is particularly appropriate at this time of year, and at this time in history, when the Reformation is so overshadowed by Halloween. Rev. Kuiper has graciously […]

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The sole purpose of this series of articles has been to show that the truth maintained by our Churches today is the historic faith of the Church—particularly since the time of the Reformation.  It is a truth which has been passed down from the fathers of the Reformation to our own forebears in the Netherlands; […]

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Some Thoughts on the Reformation

It is some four hundred and fifty years ago (447 to be exact) that Luther nailed his ninety-five theses to the door of the church at Wittenberg thus beginning what is known in history as the Protestant Reformation. Perhaps a brief review of the events which led to this memorable and earth shaking act is […]

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Philip Melanchthon (3)

The final aspect of Melanchthon’s life with which we will deal has to do with his position as the chief spokesman for the Reformation in its colloquies and consultations with the Romish Church.  In this connection, his detractors hurl the accusation of “compromiser” against him.  Usually, modern critics of Philip muffle criticism as regards Philip’s […]

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The Reformation and Denominations

This subject implies a relationship between the Reformation of 1517 and the vast number of denominations within the scope of Protestantism.  Though this has been and is assailed as a mark of failure on the part of the Protestant Reformation, I will attempt to show that the opposite is true, namely that the possibility of […]

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Philip Melanchthon (1)

The only uncontested statements about the life of Philip Melanchthon (also Melancthon) are those of his dates and places.  As soon as one steps beyond the limits of his birthdate and dwelling places, he steps into an arena of bitter dispute.  Many condemn Philip so vehemently as to be unable to say any good of […]

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A Weak Flame in a Tinder Box

The popular concept of a reformer is usually of a person with sterling, dynamic personality who slashes right and left with the sword of truth in strong, accurate, purposeful stokes while astride the white charger of righteous indignation.  He thus brings absolute light to millions who had been existing in absolute darkness, and every innovation […]

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Halloween or Reformation Day?

How wonderful in meaning are Paul’s words to Timothy as recorded in II Timothy 3:15 – “And that from a child thou hast known the holy Scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.” Equally meaningful are the same words as applied to our covenant children […]

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Northwest Iowa and Minnesota

The evening of Sunday, October 30, a Reformation Day program was held in the Hull Memorial Building. This program was sponsored by the Protestant Reformed Young People’s Societies of Hull and Doon. After the prelude by Harriet Hoksbergen, George Hoekstra, the chairman of the evening, read Scripture and opened with prayer. The program was continued […]

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The Nightingale of Wittenberg

Each year at this time, protestant Christians everywhere bring to mind a series of fateful events. One person played so major a role, so prominent a part in those events, that he will never be forgotten. That series of events is now known as the Reformation. That individual was Martin Luther. Luther himself was typical […]

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