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A Vessel unto Honor

“He shall be a vessel unto honour, sanctified, and meet for the master’s use, and prepared unto every good work.” 2 Timothy 2:21    George Martin Ophoff was many things—a husband, father, pastor, preacher, teacher, writer, and professor. But above all, he was a servant of the almighty God. He was a quiet man with […]

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It could only be expected that Classis West would take the same action against the Rev. Henry Danhof, minister of the First Christian Reformed Church of Kalamazoo, Michigan, since he had openly declared, already before synod, that he would not cease opposing the error of common grace and the three points. In the meantime, there […]

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George M Ophoff: His Last Years (27)

Now the story is quickly told. It seems as if the Lord had preserved Rev. Ophoff for this last struggle; and now that the struggle was over, the Lord was ready to take him from the battle. Already in 1952, the year before the split, Rev. Ophoff entered the hospital for stomach surgery. The pressures […]

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Rev George Ophoff: The Polemicist (26)

In our last article, we gave to our readers a quote from one of Rev. Ophoff’s Standard Bearer articles in which he began his attack upon the conditional theology which was being taught in out circles and which led to the schism of 1953. It is not our purpose to enter into the entire controversy […]

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George M. Ophoff: The Polemicist (24)

In our last article, we were talking about the basic reasons for the doctrinal controversy which troubled our Churches in the years preceding 1953. Our purpose in doing this is to describe the role which Rev. Ophoff played in this controversy, for he took an active part in the defense of the truth during those […]

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George M. Ophoff: Polemicist (23)

 Although the words “polemics” and “polemicist” are bad words in our day, nevertheless, the faithful servant of God must engage in polemics and be a polemicist if he is to be faithful to the cause of Christ in the world. The Scriptures enjoin this calling upon us, although telling us that we must always give […]

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George M. Ophoff: As Church Historian (21)

In our last article, we talked about the work which Rev. Ophoff did in the field of pastoral instruction; and we quoted briefly from his notes which he prepared for his students in school. You will recall, that our purpose in all this is to demonstrate to our readers, not only the fact that the […]

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George M. Ophoff: His Work as Professor (19)

In the last article we talked briefly about Rev. Ophoff’s labors in the congre­gation of Byron Center. If you recall what we wrote, you will also remember that our emphasis was upon the fact that Rev. Ophoff was particularly called by God to the work of professor in the Seminary of the Protestant Reformed Churches. […]

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George M. Ophoff (18)

We were talking in our last article about the work require of Rev. Ophoff during his years in the pastoral ministry in Hope and Byron Center. And we em­phasized especially the labors of the Seminary. While we intend to speak of this a bit more in detail at some future date, this is probably as […]

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George M. Ophoff (17)

In our last article we concluded the history of the controversy of 1924 and the role which Rev. Ophoff played in it. At the time of this history Rev. Ophoff was minister in what is now the Hope Protestant Reformed Church. After the formation of the Protestant Reformed Churches, Rev. Ophoff continued his work in […]

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George M. Ophoff (16)

With this article, Prof. Hanko concludes his series on the life and ministry of Rev. George M. Ophoff. In the last several issues of Beacon Lights we discussed the proceedings of Classis Grand Rapids West which led to the deposition of Rev. Ophoff and his Consistory. We do not intend to deal extensively with the […]

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George M. Ophoff (15)

In our last article we were discussing the actions of Classis Grand Rapids West in their dealings with Rev. Ophoff’s opposition to the three points of common grace. We ended last time by quoting a letter which the Classis sent to the Consistory of Hope. To this letter, an answer was returned which was read […]

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George M. Ophoff (14)

Those of our readers who are acquainted with the history of our denomination will know that, although the Synod of 1924 adopted the three points of common grace, this Synod did not pass a motion which would require the discipline of those who opposed the doctrine. In fact, the Synod specifically rejected a motion to […]

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George M. Ophoff (13)

Not too many years went by of Rev. Ophoff’s work as pastor of the congrega­tion of Hope before he became actively embroiled in the common grace contro­versy. As we noticed already in another connection, the controversy over common grace had long agitated the church before it became an ecclesiastical issue at the Synod of 1924. […]

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George M. Ophoff (10)

George Ophoff was ordained into the ministry on January 26, 1922, just one day after his 31st birthday. He was ordained pastor in an evening service in the Hope Christian Reformed Church. The congre­gation had been in existence since 1916—somewhat less than six years. During this period the congregation had been supplied by classical appointments […]

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George M. Ophoff (9)

The years George spent in the Seminary were busy ones. Seminary studies in themselves are generally sufficient to keep a conscientious student busy during most of his waking hours and often long into the night. During the years in which George prepared for the minis­try, the Seminary of the Christian Reformed Church was perhaps one […]

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George M Ophoff (8)

His Early Years In our last article we began to narrate two important incidents which took place during the years which George spent in Calvin College. The first incident of which we spoke is the death of George’s father in the explosion which destroyed the furniture factory in which he worked. The second incident which […]

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George M. Ophoff (7)

His Early Years At the time George graduated from grade school, there was as yet no Christian high school. Calvin College, located on the corner of Franklin and Madison, incorporated various high school subjects into its curriculum. Al­though Calvin College was primarily dedicated to the instruction of future teachers and ministers, anyone who wanted a […]

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George M. Ophoff (6)

In the last article we attempted to describe somewhat the kind of environ­ment into which George Ophoff was born. He was born in the city of Grand Rapids on January 25, 1891. He was born as the oldest of eight children to Frederick H. Ophoff and Yeta Hemkes Ophoff. The house in which George was […]

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George M. Ophoff (5)

In the last decade of the 1800’s, Grand Rapids was quite a different city from what it is now. It was of course, not nearly as large. It had none of the fruits of modern advances in technology which we take so much for granted today. Many of the roads were dirt covered, rutted and […]

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George M. Ophoff (4)

In our last article, we were discussing the grandfather of Rev. Ophoff, Prof. G. Hemkes. I have in my possession a story which was written by Rev. Hemkes at the time when he was a minister at De Leek and which was written while he was editor of the Yearbook published by the Reformed (Gereformeerde) […]

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